Concrete Products

APR 2018

Concrete Products covers the issues that attract producers of ready mixed and manufactured concrete focusing on equipment and material technology, market development and management topics.

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www.concreteproducts.com April 2018 • 41 CHAIRMAN'S REPORT MASON LAMPTON, PCI Standard Concrete Products produces girders, beams, slabs and piles for transportation and marine con- struction markets from Atlanta and Savannah, Ga., and Tampa, Fla., plants. Deep water port proximity enables the latter two facilities to ship product to North and South American coastal sites, although much SCP output is geared to department of transportation work in the Carolinas, Florida, Georgia and Tennessee. Based in Columbus, Ga., SCP is a successor business of the Hardaway Contracting Co., founded in the 1890s by B.H. Hardaway Sr., and one of Florida's early players in precast/prestressed concrete. B.H. Hardaway III's son-in-law, Mason H. Lampton, acquired the Hardaway Company's Tampa Prestress Divi- sion in 1997 and integrated it with Savannah and Atlanta yards to create one of the Southeast's largest concrete bridge and pile product operators. SCP President Mason Hardaway Lampton, great-great-grandson of B.H. Hardaway Sr., embraces the 2018 Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute chairmanship: "I look forward to expanding PCI's important leadership role in the buildings and infrastructure markets through our increased involvement in the government affairs arena and in new areas of value to our members such as workforce development. I also plan to continue strengthening our board's commitment to research and development, education, and marketing that increases the number of projects for which precast/prestressed concrete systems are considered the best solution among our competitors." President Donald Trump applied to certain steel imports. That action aside, PCI producers are encouraged by White House moves to a) spur infrastructure investment through innova- tive financing methods, including those that prompt state and local agencies to rethink old cost-sharing models with Washington, D.C.; b) streamline construction schedules through expedited permitting; and, c) facilitate appropriate use of design-build and public private partnership delivery methods. Under the Trump administration, Lampton notes, communities and states that adopt new proj- ect funding channels and demonstrate how they will contribute to major infrastructure contracts "are going to be rewarded." BULB-TEES' FINEST HOUR Among PCI membership, Standard Concrete Products anchored one of the most impact- ful government affairs exercises in recent years—garnering praise from the Georgia Department of Transportation, Federal High- way Administration staff and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao. When a ground-level fire brought Pied- mont Road/Interstate 85 bridge girders to the point of failure in March 2017, Georgia DOT envisioned an 11-week rebuilding period for a 700-ft. stretch of four-lane northbound and southbound sections. Standard Concrete's mobilization of engineering and production resources at Atlanta and Savannah, Ga., plants netted 61 prestressed girders, typically 40 tons, on a schedule whereby the state and C.W. Mathews Contracting Co. could reopen I-85 at Piedmont Road in six versus 11 weeks. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Michael Kannell astutely documented the Standard Concrete feat in "How a concrete company saved Atlanta's commute." "The I-85 Bridges at Piedmont Road contract is a great example of why PCI producers have better solutions for transportation construc- tion," says Lampton. "We were on the phone with DOT officials as crews were still contending with the fire and traffic rerouting. We looked at girder designs that could be cast immediately— in this case the Tuesday following a Thursday night fire. You can't do what we did on the Piedmont crossing with steel girders." STANDARD CONCRETE PRODUCTS INC. At-A-Gl A nce

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