Concrete Products

SEP 2018

Concrete Products covers the issues that attract producers of ready mixed and manufactured concrete focusing on equipment and material technology, market development and management topics.

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www.concreteproducts.com September 2018 • 41 INNOVATIONS REPORT ARGONICS URETHANE LINERS EXTREME WEAR RESISTANCE Urethane elastomers' abrasion resistance has led to many key concrete and aggregate plant applications. "In plants that handle bulk mate- rials, where severe wear is a problem, special urethane formulations like Kryptane can last several times longer than steel or rubber, which reduces production downtime, replacement cost, and labor for change out," says Argonics Industry Product Specialist Jesse Roberge. Compared to steel liners, urethane significantly reduces the noise level of material handling and transfer, he adds, noting, "When aggre- gate falls onto metal, it can be quite loud, particularly if it is in an enclosed building. Because the urethane has natural resilience, it deadens the sound quite a bit and makes conversation easier." Kryptane, an extremely wear-resistant material the company formulated for conditions where abrasion, sliding, or impact occur regularly, is often used for drum, chute, bin, hopper, and conveyor liners. Different applications require different thicknesses of ure- thane. "For an aggregate batcher or bin/hopper, we recommend a ½- to ¾-in. thick liner, which can last five to 10 years," says Roberge. "In fact, some wear liner manufacturers offer a warranty of several years or based on the yardage put through a drum." To most effectively control extreme wear, such as for feed chutes, discharge chutes, and turnheads, he recommends the use of liners that actually embed ceramics into the urethane: "[They] can be optimized to resist not only sliding abrasion, but also impact, or various combinations of the two. This approach can last up to 10 times longer than steel or rubber alone, and up to four times longer than urethane alone." To resist liner degradation in hot, humid climates and further extend liner life, Roberge also advises the use of an ether versus a typical ester urethane formulation. FIELD INSTALLATION Concrete plant staff can cut and install wear liners on their own using weld-in or bolt-in methods. Standard Argonics urethane sheet sizes are 4- x 8- or 10-ft. and 5- x 8- or 10-ft., in 3/16 in. to 1 in. thick- nesses. Urethane or embedded-tile urethane rolls are available in 4 x 25 ft. or 5 x 100 ft. sizes, or 12- x 12- or 18-ft. modular panels—all in a variety of thicknesses. The materials can be quickly welded or bolted in to manage certain common "hot spot" conditions. Bulk material handling equipment manufacturers and users turn to custom liners in instances where standard sheets do not fit, size or weight is a concern, or a long-term wear solution is required. "When custom liners are cut to an exact size or pre-molded to fit right into the equipment, it eliminates wasted material and the need to cut and trim onsite," says Roberge. "Because such pieces are manufactured to fit precisely together, they install quickly with minimal production downtime. They are also easy to replace a piece at a time as needed." The customer typically provides a sketch, drawing, or photo of the bulk handling equipment to be lined, along with dimensions and notes, he adds. The wear liner fabricator then finishes the drawings and provides a quote. — Argonics Inc., Gwinn, Mich., 800/991-2746; www.argonics.com 99.7% Efficiency Temperatures as High as 199°F Economical Choice for the Concrete Industry RM 99 Series Water Heating 500 - 8,000 lbs/hr Reduces Concrete Hardening Time 60% Cost Savings Enhanced Cement Hydration Vaporator Series Steam Production CONCRETE CURING S O L U T I O N S f o r t h e c o n c r e t e & r e a d y - m i x i n d u s t r y 8 0 0 . 6 3 3 . 7 0 5 5 | w w w . k e m c o s y s t e m s . c o m

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