Concrete Products

AUG 2014

Concrete Products covers the issues that attract producers of ready mixed and manufactured concrete focusing on equipment and material technology, market development and management topics.

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28 • August 2014 www.concreteproducts.com A new finishing method for roller compact- ed concrete pavement nets surface durability and uniformity to give contractors or owners pause on incurring the expense of asphalt wear courses commonly specified over RCC bases. The first commercial application took place at a suburban Chicago jobsite with Bridgeview, Ill., ready mixed producer VCNA Prairie Material leading the charge. The method calls for standard placement of RCC mixes in 6-in. or less lifts or layers, followed by vibratory and static drum roller compaction. Crews then spray slabs with RCC Surface Pro, a silica-rich troweling aid spe- cifcally engineered for low slump concrete. Troweling creates a foat-ready paste, while the agent's chemistry promotes additional cement hydration, ultimately hardening and densifying the upper slab layer. "RCC Surface Pro could be a game chang- er. We can now offer a monolithic roller com- pacted concrete slab with a fnish much more typical of traffc-ready asphalt or conven- tional, broom-fnished concrete," says Prai- rie Material Marketing/Product Specialist Theron Tobolski, who oversaw placement of 1,000 yd. of RCC mixes at 246-acre Maryhill Cemetery in Niles, Ill. Troweled, monolithic RCC economizes pavements when factoring material, crew and equipment mobilization costs associated with adding a 2-in. asphalt wear course, he adds. During an early-summer window, Prairie Material and Hickory Hills, Ill., contractor J&R 1st in Asphalt Inc. offered RCC pavement options to replace old driveway, parking lot and service area asphalt at Maryhill—one of the Archdiocese of Chicago's 46 Catholic Cemeteries properties. An initial placement involved 4,000 sq. ft. of inconspicuous pave- ment at the rear of the facility's maintenance shop. It consisted of conventional, two-layer FEATURE BY DON MARSH CLEAN SWEEP Prairie Material, paving crew demonstrate power-troweled, broomed RCC

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